SearchDirectoriesHelpSite MapHome
Wake Forest University

News Releases

Stories this week at WFU

By Jacob McConnico
336.758.5237
March 8, 2006

COACHTALK: THE HIDDEN MESSAGE OF POST-GAME COMMENTS — Ever notice that whether their teams win or lose, coaches seem to say the same things? John Llewellyn, a communication professor at Wake Forest, says you are not imagining things. "After a while, if you listen to enough coaches, you begin to think you've heard it all," Llewellyn said. "The odds are you have." For nearly two decades, Llewellyn researched the professional vocabulary of NCAA Division I men's college basketball coaches for "Coachtalk," a chapter in the book "Case Studies in Sport Communication." He says there is a pattern in what winning and losing coaches say after each game that reveals respect for each other and the world of athletics. An expert on rhetoric, Llewellyn has experience talking with broadcast and print media. He is available for interviews about his research and to analyze coaches' comments during March Madness. Contact Llewellyn directly at llewelly@wfu.edu or (336) 758-4511.

Contact: Maggie Barrett, barretmb@wfu.edu or 336-758-5237.

STUDENT VOLUNTEERS RETURN FROM GULF COAST THIS WEEK — More than 100 Wake Forest students will return from service trips to the Gulf Coast between March 9 and 11. Five Wake Forest student organizations — the Volunteer Service Corps, the Reformed University Fellowship, Wake Forest Catholic Campus Ministry, the Baptist Student Union and the Lutheran Student Ministry — spent their spring breaks providing various types of disaster relief for victims of Hurricane Katrina. The students helped build storage sheds, clean up debris, sort food and clothing and tutor elementary-age students. Interviews can be arranged with students upon their return.

Contact: Pam Barrett, barretpm@wfu.edu or 336-758-5237.

WFU STUDENTS RETURN FROM NICARAGUA MARCH 11 — Sixteen Wake Forest students of different denominations will return from a service trip with the Wesley Foundation of Wake Forest to Leon, Nicaragua. They have been working with El Ayundante (The Helper), an inter-denominational service organization in Nicaragua to help build classrooms and a retaining wall at a school, conduct Vacation Bible School sessions for children and work with special needs children. The group will return March 11. Interviews can be arranged.

Contact: Pam Barrett, barretpm@wfu.edu or 336-758-5237.

WFU CELEBRATES EVERYTHING IRISH — Wake Forest will host the 9th Annual Wake Forest University Irish Festival from March 11 - March 17. Sponsored by the Wake Forest University Press, the event will open with its popular free Community Day from 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. March 11 at Davis Field on the campus of Wake Forest. Past Community Days have drawn crowds of more than 3,000 people to enjoy Irish cultural activities, including music, dancing, storytelling, hurling and children's activities. The festival will continue at 7:30 p.m. March 15 with a free poetry reading and performance by Irish poet and musician Ciaran Carson and his wife, acclaimed Irish fiddler Deirdre Shannon. At 4 p.m. March 16, a free exhibit and discussion titled "Portals of Culture: An Exhibition and Discussion of the Dolmen Press Archive and Wake Forest University Press" will be held in the Z. Smith Reynolds Library's Rare Books Reading Room. The festival will conclude with "Irish Tales and Other Blarney," an evening of Irish storytelling on at 7:30 p.m. March 17 at Blessings Gallery located at 823 Reynolda Road in Winston-Salem. Admission is $5. Media are invited to all events. Interviews can be arranged by the News Service. Stories on all Irish Festival activities are available on the News Service Web site at www.wfu.edu/wfunews.

Contact: Pam Barrett, barretpm@wfu.edu or 336-758-5237.

COOKING UP CREATIVITY AT WAKE FOREST — During March, Wake Forest is hosting "COOK IT UP — A Creativity Forum," an interactive series of events designed to inspire participants to think about creativity and what it means to be creative. The series, which is free and open to the public, consists of events featuring open discussions centered on the nature of creativity led by Wake Forest faculty. As part of their coursework, students taking a class in creativity and innovation plan and execute each event, deciding what food to serve and how to serve it, as well as what kind of decorations and furnishings should be used to create the setting. The next event takes place at 6 p.m. March 12 in the common area of Luter Residence Hall. For more information on "COOK IT UP," call (336) 758-3383.

Contact: Maggie Barrett, barretmb@wfu.edu or 336-758-5237.

DIVINITY SCHOOL TO PRESENT AWARDS AT CHAPEL SERVICE — The Wake Forest Divinity School will hold a free, public chapel service at 11 a.m. March 14 in Wait Chapel. During the service, Geneva Brown, a member of the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Board of Education, and Walter Harrelson, former dean at the University of Chicago and Vanderbilt University divinity schools, will receive Distinguished Service Awards from the Divinity School. Divinity School officials will also announce creation of the Bill & Judith Moyers Scholar Program during the chapel service. The scholar program, created with a $100,000 gift from James M. and Marilyn Dunn of Winston-Salem, will provide funding for one Divinity School student a year to serve as an intern at the Baptist Joint Committee on Religious Liberty in Washington, D.C. Judith Moyers will lecture at 3 p.m. March 14 to students in the Wake Forest Divinity School course "God and the New York Times: Religion in Contemporary America." The course is taught by Bill Leonard, dean of the Divinity School, and James Dunn. The lecture is open to students and faculty in the Divinity School, the counseling department and women's and gender studies. It will be held in Wingate Hall, Room 302.

Contact: Jake McConnico, mcconnjn@wfu.edu or 336-758-5237.

HATCH TO DISCUSS DEMOCRATIZATION OF AMERICAN CHRISTIANITY — Wake Forest President Nathan O. Hatch will discuss his book "The Democratization of American Christianity" at 3 p.m. March 14 in the Rhoda K. Channing Reading Room of the university's Z. Smith Reynolds Library. Hatch, who is regularly cited as one of the most influential scholars in the study of the history of religion in America, released the book in 1989. It offers a reassessment of religion and culture during the early days of the republic and argues that during this period, American Christianity was democratized, and commoners became powerful actors on the religious scene. The book, which won national acclaim and garnered three major prizes, examines five traditions or mass movements that emerged early in the 19th century — the Christian movement, Methodism, the Baptist movement, the black churches and the Mormons. It outlines how the various religious traditions offered the unschooled and unsophisticated people of the time visions of individual potential and collective aspiration.

Contact: Jake McConnico, mcconnjn@wfu.edu or 336-758-5237.

'MARTHA IN LATTIMORE' TO PLAY AT RIVERRUN FILM FESTIVAL — "Martha in Lattimore," the documentary about Martha Mason, a Wake Forest graduate who has lived with the assistance of an iron lung for 57 years, will be screened at the RiverRun International Film Festival at 7 p.m. March 17 and 18. The film will be shown both nights at Centenary United Methodist Church, located at 646 W. Fifth St. in Winston-Salem. Two Wake Forest professors, Mary Dalton and Michelle Gillespie, worked on the film. "We have tried to show, at least to some degree, what a remarkable person Martha is by telling her story in the context of her daily life," Dalton said. This marks the first local screening of the final version of the film. Wake Forest graduates who worked on the film include George Reasner and Robert Costner. For information about the screenings and ticket sales, go to www.riverrunfilm.com.

Contact: Maggie Barrett, barretmb@wfu.edu or 336-758-5237.

NATIVE AMERICAN FAMILY DAY HIGHLIGHTS FOUR TRIBES — Wake Forest's Anthropology Club will host a Native American Family Day at the university's Museum of Anthropology from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. March 25. The free event will include 14 booths highlighting four different Native American tribes from the four directions — north, south, east and west. The theme will revolve around a mythical story from each of the tribes. Booths will also feature related craft activities, music and food.

Contact: Pam Barrett, barretpm@wfu.edu or 336-758-5237.

STUDENTS 'WAKE 'N SHAKE' TO RAISE $45,000 FOR CANCER FUND — Wake Forest students hope to register at least 300 dancers who will dance to raise at least $45,000 for cancer research at the university's first Wake 'N Shake Dance Marathon from noon to midnight March 25 in Reynolds Gym. All proceeds will go to the Brian Piccolo Cancer Fund, which supports the Comprehensive Cancer Center at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. The general public is encouraged to participate as dancers or sponsors. Registration is $15 and dancers are asked to raise funds through individual sponsorships. Dancers will also participate in a variety of activities, including games, competitions and group line dancing. The event will also include guest speakers — cancer survivors, families and friends of cancer victims, Wake Forest President Nathan O. Hatch and football coach Jim Grobe. For information about participating, visit www.wakenshake.com or contact one of the dance marathon chairs: Jillian MacDonald at macdjm3@wfu.edu; Sebastian Ehreiser at ehresh3@wfu.edu; or Matt Hammer at hammmj3@wfu.edu. Advance interviews and media coverage during the event can be arranged.

Contact: Pam Barrett, barretpm@wfu.edu or 336-758-5237.


WFU News Website Search



Wake Forest
Wake Forest University • Winston-Salem, North Carolina • Information: 336.758.5000 | Feedback