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April 14, 2009

BEYOND THE SAT:  RETHINKING COLLEGE ADMISSIONS – Admissions officers and leading researchers from Harvard, Princeton, Berkeley, the University of Texas, the University of Virginia, Yale and others will gather at Wake Forest April 15 and 16 for “Rethinking Admissions,” a conference focused on changing admissions practices and the role standardized testing plays in the process.  Wake Forest last summer became the first top-30 national university to make SAT scores optional for applicants and decided to host the conference to provide a forum where new research could be presented on the ability of standardized tests to predict college success, as well as the role that class ranking, grades, and advanced placement exams play in identifying top-performing students. “At Wake Forest, we take admissions very seriously so we have invited representatives from some of the country’s finest universities to continue the conversation about the best admissions practices to build a campus of diverse thinkers, scholars and leaders,” said Wake Forest Provost Jill Tiefenthaler. “Another thing that makes this conference unique is that it brings together scholars with admissions practitioners to integrate the latest research with best practices.”

Contact: Cheryl Walker, walkercv@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

PULITZER-PRIZE WINNING AUTHOR TO GIVE KEYNOTE ADDRESS – Author Daniel Golden, who won the Pulitzer Prize for a series of articles he wrote on inequities in college admissions, will deliver the keynote address for the conference “Rethinking Admissions” at 4 p.m. April 15 in the Pugh Auditorium at Benson University Center. His presentation, titled “Slumdog Ivy Leaguer,” will draw parallels between the obstacles faced by low-income students trying to get into Ivy League schools and the homeless hero in the Academy Award-winning movie “Slumdog Millionaire.”  Golden is a senior editor at Conde Nast Portfolio, a former deputy bureau chief for the Boston bureau of the Wall Street Journal and author of the “The Price of Admission”published in 2006.

Contact: Cheryl Walker, walkercv@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

INTELLIGENCE AND NATIONAL SECURITY LESSONS FROM 9/11 – Loch Johnson, Regents Professor of Public and International Affairs at the University of Georgia and Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar, will give a free talk titled, “The 9/11 Attacks, Iraqi WMDs and the Decline and Fall of the CIA” at 5 p.m. April 14 in Tribble Hall’s DeTamble Auditorium. Johnson is senior editor of the international journal “Intelligence and National Security” and is the author of more than 150 articles and books on U.S. national security, including “Seven Sins of American Foreign Policy,” “Handbook of Intelligence Studies” and the five-volume “Strategic Intelligence.” In his talk, Johnson will explore the failure of the intelligence agencies to warn the nation of the impending 9/11 terrorist attacks against New York City and Washington, D.C. Johnson says, “This is a story of profound mistakes by America’s intelligence professionals, of the inability of policymakers to act on important information that the intelligence professionals did provide, and in the aftermath of the twin disasters, of how the politics of Washington subverted a promising opportunity for a new approach to intelligence and security in the United States.” Johnson will be on campus April 13 – 16 and is available to talk with reporters.

Contact: Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

SALEM COLLEGE PROFESSOR TO READ POETRY, FICTION – Amy Knox Brown, assistant professor of creative writing and English at Salem College, will read selections from her poetry chapbook, “Advice from Household Gods,” and a story from her short fiction collection, “Three Versions of the Truth,” at 4 p.m. April 15 in Room 204 at Wake Forest University’s Z. Smith Reynolds Library.  The event, which is part of the spring 2009 Library Series, is free and open to the public.  Brown’s writing has been published in Shenandoah, Missouri Review, Other Voices, Nebraska Review and other literary magazines.  Brown is a native of Lincoln, Neb. She received a bachelor’s degree in creative writing from Stephens College in Columbia, Mo., and from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, she holds a master’s degree and doctorate in English and creative writing, as well as a law degree.

Contact: Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

STRING QUARTET, PIANIST TO CLOSE SECREST SEASON – Recognized as one of the world’s leading string quartets, the Takacs Quartet will perform with renowned pianist Marc-André Hamelin at 7:30 p.m. April 16 in Brendle Recital Hall in Scales Fine Arts Center.  The concert will conclude Wake Forest’s 2008-2009 Secrest Artists Series.  The quartet and Hamelin are making a rare return to the Secrest Series because of the popularity of their past appearances, but the two have never performed together. The concert program will include Schumann’s “Piano Quintet,” Bartok’s “String Quartet No. 1” and “String Quartet Op. 77 No. 1” by Haydn.  In conjunction with the concert, a free Secrest Signature pre-performance talk with Scott Klein, associate professor of English at Wake Forest, will be held at 6:40 p.m. in Room 208 adjacent to Brendle Recital Hall.  The Takacs String Quartet formed in 1975 at the Franz Liszt Academy in Budapest. Today, they perform 90 concerts a year worldwide and have won numerous awards including a Grammy Award.  Marc-André Hamelin, an eight-time Grammy nominee, is known worldwide for his originality and technical skill demonstrated through his performances of classic repertoire. He has recorded more than 35 CDs and continues to perform all over the world and at numerous music festivals, including the Aspen Music Festival, the Minnesota Beethoven Festival and other international festivals.  Tickets for the concert are $18; $15 for senior citizens and students; $5 for children under 12. Tickets are available at the Wake Forest University Theatre Box Office at (336) 758-5295.

Contact: Pam Barrett, barretpm@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

WAKE FOREST TO HOST PIEDMONT EARTH DAY FAIR – The Wake Forest Reynolda campus will be the site of the fourth annual Piedmont Earth Day Fair from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 18. The event, presented by the Piedmont Environmental Alliance (www.peaNC.org) and local sponsors, is a free,“zero waste challenge” event featuring 120 exhibits on environmental topics, interactive educational children's activities, panel discussions on green jobs and sustainable food, a green car parade, and eco-friendly gifts and goods andall-natural foods and beverages for sale. As a zero waste challenge event, vendors will offer only recyclable or compostable packaging and food service items. Recycling and composting bins, but no trash cans, will be available throughout the fair. Participants will be asked to carry out with them anything that cannot be recycled or composted. For more information, visit the Web site or call Amy Lindsey at (336) 577-6035.

Contact: Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

FIFTH ANNUAL DESK EVENT HELPS ELEMENTARY STUDENTS – Wake Forest students will gather on Manchester Plaza from 4 p.m. until 7 p.m. April 21 to paint and donate desks for area elementary students.The goal of Developing Education through Student Knowledge, or D.E.S.K., is to provide desks, chairs and school supplies for children in the Winston-Salem community who are in need of a place to study and learn in their homes. The annual community service project was started by two Wake Forest students after they identified a lack of workspace in the homes of the students they tutored. The first D.E.S.K event in 2004 included 15 student organizations and provided 20 desks for Old Town Elementary School students. This year, more than 40 student organizations have signed up to paint desks for 57 children at Old Town Elementary. Selected students in need of a desk are paired with a team of five to 10 Wake Forest students. Team members paint their desk according to the interests of the individual child. Prizes will be awarded to the team with the best painted desk.

Contact: Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

TALK EXPLORES MUSIC AND THE LEARNING PROCESS – Peter Perret, former conductor of the Winston-Salem Symphony, will present “Music, Mind and Learning” at 4 p.m. April 22 in Room 204 at Wake Forest University’s Z. Smith Reynolds Library.  The event, which is part of the spring 2009 Library Lecture Series, is free and open to the public.  Perret will talk about the origins of music/brain research and discuss recent discoveries with an eye toward practical applications.  Perret is the creator of the Music, Mind & Learning method (formerly known as the Bolton Project), in which a woodwind quintet takes on a residency in an underachieving elementary school using music to significantly increase reading and math abilities.  He speaks frequently on the connection between music, brain development and the learning process and has made presentations at the American Symphony Orchestra League, Orchestras Canada, the National Dyslexia Research Foundation and the Singapore Arts Academy.  In addition to serving previously as music director of the Winston-Salem Symphony, Perret has led the Buffalo Philharmonic in New York and the Cape Town Symphony Orchestra in South Africa.  Perret holds advanced degrees in conducting and chamber music from the Conservatoire Royal de Belgique in Brussels, Belgium, and in conducting from Accademia Chigiana in Siena, Italy.  For more information on the event, call (336) 758-4713.

Contact: Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

RAPE IN THE U.S. MILITARY – Ann Wright, a 29-year veteran of the Army and Army Reserves, says that “one in three women who join the U.S. military will be sexually assaulted or raped by men in the military.” Wright will talk about her research at 7 p.m. April 22 in Pugh Auditorium at the Benson University Center. Her talk is titled “Camouflaged Rapes: U.S. Military Cover-ups.” Wright was one of three State Department officials who resigned in March, 2003, over the imminent invasion of Iraq. She is co-author of “Dissent: Voices of Conscience,” published in 2008. Since resigning, Wright has been researching rapes of U.S. military women by U.S. military men in Iraq and Afghanistan. Her work exposing rape in military settings is helping to define how the U.S. government will address military sexual abuse, harassment and gender issues.

Contact: Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

REGIONAL BAPTISTS TO GATHER AT WAKE FOREST – President Jimmy Carter and writer Maya Angelou, Reynolds Professor of American Studies at Wake Forest, will deliver keynote addresses during the Southeast regional gathering of the New Baptist Covenant, April 24 and 25 in Wait Chapel at Wake Forest. The event is free and open to the public. The gathering will include worship services and workshops offering strategies for churches to respond to pressing social and spiritual needs in a time of economic crisis. The theme of the gathering is “This is God’s Year to Act: Responding to a Society in Crisis.” Angelou will speak during the opening worship service beginning at 1 p.m. April 24, along with a seminary student selected in a national competition to identify excellence among young preachers. Carter will speak at 2:30 p.m. April 25 during the closing worship service. Workshops during the two days will be presented in Benson University Center, led by individuals from the region working in ministries related to education, homelessness, health care, the environment and immigration. “Baptists are called to live out the mandates of Christ to care for persons in need,” says Bill Leonard, dean of the Wake Forest School of Divinity and co-chair of the gathering. “The regional meeting isan effort to bringBaptists together around common servicein feeding the hungry, clothing the naked, caring for the sick and the imprisoned.”A full schedule for the New Baptist Covenant regional gathering at Wake Forest is online at www.newbaptistcovenantse.org.

Contact: Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

TALKING BIOETHICS:  FROM STEM CELL RESEARCH TO END-OF-LIFE DECISIONS – To increase public discussion of bioethics in medicine and research, Wake Forest will bring together communication scholars, bioethics scholars, scientists and others for the “Bioethics, Moral Argument and Social Responsibility” conference April 27 and 28.  From stem cell research to genetic testing to end-of-life decisions, the conference will address biomedical topics and engage a broad public audience in discussion of the ethical and public policy controversies surrounding them.  Among the conference faculty are two representatives from the President’s Council on Bioethics.  The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.  Sessions will take place in Carswell Hall’s Annenberg Forum on the Wake Forest campus. “The conference brings together those who have a voice in the debate right now and experts who have national and international reputations,” said Michael Hyde, Wake Forest University Distinguished Chair in Communication Ethics and co-organizer of the conference.  “Biotechnology, more than anything else, is going to change what it means to be a human being. That is what is so scary and so wonderful about it.”

Contact:  Cheryl Walker, walkercv@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.


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