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Stories this week at Wake Forest University


October 22, 2008

BIDEN TO SPEAK AT CAMPAIGN RALLY ON HEARN PLAZA — Democratic vice-presidential candidate Sen. Joseph Biden will speak at a rally organized by the Obama/Biden campaign at 2:15 p.m. Oct. 23 on Hearn Plaza in front of Reynolda Hall.  The event is free and open to the public, but space is available on a first-come, first-served basis.  Access will begin at 12:15 p.m. to an enclosed area on Hearn Plaza set aside for the event.  Members of the public coming to the event may park at Wake Forest’s BB&T Field on Deacon Boulevard. Buses arranged by the campaign will provide transportation to and from the event for the public. The buses will run from 11:15 a.m. until 5:30 p.m.  Some parking lots near Hearn Plaza will be closed on Oct. 23. University officials ask the public not to attempt to park on campus, due to limited parking availability.  Members of the news media may park their passenger vehicles in Lot B on the west side of Hearn Plaza. Satellite and live trucks may park in Lot N on the east side of Hearn Plaza. News media should carry their credentials.

Contact: Kevin Cox, coxkp@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

 

2008 ELECTION SOURCES AVAILABLE Wake Forest faculty members are available to comment on the 2008 election. Experts are available from a wide range of areas, including political science, debate, religion, law and business, covering topics such as campaign ads, presidential debates, health care, banking, political scandal and young voters. Visit www.wfu.edu/wfunews/2008/election/ for a searchable list of experts and issues.

Contact: Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

 

ELECTION REFLECTS CHANGING STATE DEMOGRAPHICS — Tight races in North Carolina’s 2008 election reflect a state that is undergoing significant political and economic changes, according to Jack Fleer, professor emeritus of political science. Fleer says the changing state demographics include a more urban population, a large influx of non-native voters who tend to be more middle class, and college-educated, professional employees with more moderate and non-ideological political views. Fleer notes that new voter registrations are giving the Democratic Party an advantage this year, although he says Republican voters tend to be more dependable in going to the polls. “Registered independents are almost one-fourth of the electorate, and will determine the outcome of most elections,” Fleer says. “Voter turnout will be key in the major contests.” Fleer does not rule out Republican gains in the state, even though the party is being outspent 8-to-1 in political advertising. “The Republican Party has shown superior get-out-the-vote efforts in recent elections, has the agent of change status at the state level and will put up a strong fight up and down the ballot,” he says.  Fleer is watching to see if historical patterns hold this year, with Republicans winning federal seats and Democrats winning state posts.

Contact: Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

 

‘AMERICA IS NOT GOING SOCIALIST’ — David Coates, professor of political science, says the United States does not face socialism but a slightly more managed capitalism. “With the bank crisis in full flow and an interventionist Democratic presidential candidate ahead in the polls, many commentators have started to claim that we drift toward socialism, but that is not happening,” he says. “What we face is simply state intervention in the banking system designed explicitly to strengthen the rest of the private sector. That intervention will be large. It will also be temporary, and it has happened before. It happened in Sweden in the 1990s and in the U.S. in the 1930s, on both occasions helping to trigger long-term, private-sector growth.” Coates notes that the federal government is already heavily involved in the economy, subsidizing the agricultural sector and spending taxpayer money on engineering projects “from guns and tanks to spaceships.” Coates says the rest of the industrial world flourishes under such a system and that if managed properly, so will the America.

Contact: Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

 

Analyzing North Carolina voting patterns — North Carolina voters have taken strikingly different approaches over the last quarter century when casting ballots for president, senator and governor. These patterns provide a baseline for analyzing the 2008 contests, according to John Dinan, associate professor of political science at Wake Forest. “Since 1984, North Carolina voters have sided with Republican presidential candidates in every election and by an average margin of 12 percentage points,” he says. Dinan notes that in senate contests during this time, N.C. voters sided with Republican candidates in all but two elections, and by an average margin of 3.2 percentage points. However, in gubernatorial elections, Dinan says N.C. voters sided with Democratic candidates in all but two elections and by an average margin of 3.4 percentage points. Dinan is currently teaching a seminar called “The 2008 Elections.”

Contact: Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

Examining the culture of pornography — The Porn Wars Symposium will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 25 in Carswell Hall’s Annenberg Forum, Room 111. Participants will examine how the proliferation of pornographic imagery reaches into the daily lives of Americans. Matt Ezzell, board member of the Stop Porn Culture organization, will speak on masculinity and pop culture;Ann Scales, visiting professor of law at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Law, will discuss new legal remedies to address the harm caused by pornography; and Jane Caputi, professor of women’s studies at Florida Atlantic University, will show her film, “The Pornography of Everyday Life.”  Students in the course “Teaching Feminist Activism and Creating Feminist Activists,” taught by Activist-in-Residence Patricia Willis, are taking the lead in organizing the event.

  • The series will continue at 7 p.m. Oct. 30 in Brendle Recital Hall with a multimedia presentation by Gail Dines, professor of sociology and women’s studies at Wheelock College, on pornography’s effects on society, relationships and individuals.
  • A symposium on free speech will follow at the Worrell Professional Center, Room 1309, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 31.

All events are free and open to the public. The Porn Wars Symposium and the multimedia presentation are limited to individuals 18 and older. Willis, her students and the presenters are all available for advance interviews.

Contact: Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

 

20 YEARS OF PROJECT PUMPKIN MAGIC — Nearly 2,500 children from 40 community agencies have been invited to participate in Wake Forest University’s “Project Pumpkin,” a Halloween celebration from 3 – 6 p.m. Oct. 28 on Hearn Plaza between Wait Chapel and Reynolda Hall. The theme for this year’s event is “20 Years of Magic,” an anniversary celebration with a fantasy theme. Wake Forest students have been visiting participating agencies to interact with the children before they arrive on campus, and to help the children create decorations for Hearn Plaza. Interviews and morning show segments with Project Pumpkin organizers and participating agency representatives can be arranged. At the event, media representatives must check in at the media table in front of Wait chapel to receive a press kit and find out which children cannot be photographed.

Contact: Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

CALLOWAY SCHOLAR JOINS SEC STUDY OF SARBANES-OXLEY — George Aldhizer, PricewaterhouseCoopers Faculty Fellow and associate professor of accounting at Wake Forest’s Calloway School of Business and Accountancy, has been selected to assist in a cost-benefit study of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.  Section 404 was intended to help ensure that public companies provide investors and creditors with more reliable financial reporting by requiring the documentation and testing of various internal controls.  The national study is the first funded by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to collect and analyze the “real world” costs and benefits of Section 404 compliance.  Aldhizer will work with two market research companies, The Henne Group and QSA Integrated Research Solutions, to survey thousands of public companies subject to the regulations and to analyze and interpret the data collected. The final report to the SEC is expected to be ready in late spring 2009.  Aldhizer is available to discuss how issues related to Sarbanes-Oxley have been raised during the current financial crisis.

Contact: Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

 

ENTREPRENEURSHIP PROGRAMS GARNER TWO AWARDS — The Global Consortium of Entrepreneurship Centers has chosen Wake Forest University as the recipient of two annual awards, marking the first time any school has won two GCEC awards in the same year.  The awards were presented at the 2008 GCEC annual conference in Tucson, Ariz.  Wake Forest’s Office of Entrepreneurship and Liberal Arts and the Babcock Graduate School of Management’s Angell Center for Entrepreneurship collaborated to jointly win the GCEC Award for Excellence in Entrepreneurship Teaching and Pedagogical Innovations and the GCEC Award for Exceptional Activities in Entrepreneurship Across the Disciplines.  Elizabeth Gatewood, director of the Office of Entrepreneurship and Liberal Arts, and Stan Mandel, director of the Angell Center for Entrepreneurship, are available to discuss the innovative entrepreneurship programs available at Wake Forest, where the new entrepreneurship minor has become the largest and fastest-growing minor.

Contact: Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.


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