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Stories this week at Wake Forest University


September 24, 2008

Wake Forest University students, faculty and staff will compete in an eight-hour relay race around Hearn Plaza beginning at 11 a.m. Sept. 25, as teams of seven to 15 participants compete to raise both money and awareness for the fight against cancer. The fifth annual Hit the Bricks event will raise funds for Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center’s Comprehensive Cancer Center. Throughout the day, hundreds of participants will take turns running, jogging or walking around Hearn Plaza. At 7 p.m., participants will walk a final remembrance lap for cancer victims and survivors. The daylong event will end with a luminary ceremony in front of Reynolda Hall. For more information, visit www.hitthebricksforbrian.org.  On Oct. 4, Birdies for Brian, a new event to raise funds for the Brian Piccolo Cancer Drive, will be held at Tanglewood Park. Theta Chi and the Interfraternity Council are hosting the golf tournament. Taylor Donner, a Wake Forest junior, says his fraternity is doing so because “every person in the community has either known someone who had or has cancer, or has had it themselves. These Brian Piccolo events are great for raising money for cancer research because each event really does try to get the entire campus involved.”

Contact: Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

HEALTH REFORMS AND THE ELECTIONS Health policy experts will gather at Wake Forest Sept. 25 for a panel discussion on health reform and the 2008 elections.  Free and open to the public, the event will take place from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. in Carswell Hall’s Annenberg Forum, Room 111.  Health policy scholar Jonathan B. Oberlander of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will make a presentation at the panel discussion.  Panelists from Wake Forest include:  Mark Hall, Fred D. and Elizabeth L. Turnage Professor of Law at Wake Forest School of Law and professor of social sciences and health policy at Wake Forest School of Medicine; Michael S. Lawlor, professor of economics and director of the undergraduate minor in health policy and administration; and Alison Snow Jones, associate professor of social sciences and health policy at Wake Forest School of Medicine.  The discussion is sponsored by the Wake Forest School of Medicine’s Program in Bioethics, Health and Society and the Wake Forest Department of Communication.

Contact:  Kevin Cox, coxkp@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

 

WFU ALUMNUS KICKS OFF WRITERS READING SERIES — Wake Forest alumnus and author Clint McCown will kick off the fall 2008 Dillon Johnston Writers Reading Series with a reading and book discussion at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 25 in Tribble Hall’s DeTamble Auditorium.  The event is free and open to the public, and a reception and book signing will follow the reading.  McCown, who has published three novels and three volumes of poems, has received numerous literary awards and has also worked as an editor, a screenwriter and as an actor.  He is a professor of English at Virginia Commonwealth University, where he serves on the creative writing faculty and teaches fiction writing, creative nonfiction writing and literary journalism.  He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in English from Wake Forest and a Master of Fine Arts degree from Indiana University.

Contact: Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237

 

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ CONCERT TO RAISE REBUILDING FUNDS Irvin Mayfield and the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra (NOJO) will make its North Carolina debut as part of Wake Forest’s Secrest Artists Series at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 25 in Wait Chapel.  Tickets to the concert are available through the Box Office at (336) 758-5295.  Concertgoers will have the opportunity to support the New Orleans Public Library Rebuild Project, which is raising money to rebuild or repair library branches damaged by Hurricane Katrina.  As part of a collaborative effort between Wake Forest and the arts-magnet program at Reynolds High School, Reynolds students will be given a private concert by the NOJO.  Musicians will also hold interdisciplinary workshops.  Class officers will present the musicians with the money they collected during a school-wide service project/contest to assist with the NOPL Rebuild Project. 

Contact: Pam Barrett, barretpm@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

 

FINANCE PROFESSOR TO DISCUSS WALL STREET TURMOIL — Robert Bliss, professorand F.M. Kirby Chair in Business Excellence at Wake Forest’s Calloway School of Business and Accountancy, will discuss the financial crisis in a special lecture for Babcock Graduate School of Management students only at 2:30 p.m. Sept. 26 at the Worrell Professional Center, Room 1312 (the Law Auditorium).  The event is not open to the general public, but members of the media are invited to attend.  Bliss will field questions from the audience and will be available for interviews after the lecture.  Bliss, an expert on banking, financial market regulation and insolvency resolution, joined the Wake Forest faculty in 2004 after serving five years as senior financial economist and economic advisor at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and previous posts as a senior researcher at the Bank of England and the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.  The lecture will feature an explanation of some of the financial instruments at the heart of the sub-prime mortgage industry collapse, as well as a discussion of the federal takeover of mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the demise of Lehman Brothers, the bailout of AIG and the hotly debated plan to use $700 billion to acquire troubled mortgages from struggling banks and other lenders.

Contact: Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

 

EVENT SHOWCASES UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECTS — The broad range of academic inquiry being pursued by undergraduates at Wake Forest will be on display during an undergraduate research symposium from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 26  in Rooms 401, 407 and 409 at the Benson University Center.  The event is free and open to the public.  More than 80 research projects will be presented through poster exhibits and oral presentations.  About 20 departments across campus will be represented at the symposium, with projects from the physical and social sciences, languages and the arts,  spanning the ancient to the contemporary and the local to the international.  Examples include a study of organic farming and agrotourism in Vancouver, British Columbia; an examination of religious architecture in Italy; a study of investor behavior in the Shanghai Stock Exchange, an assessment of cardiovascular risk in collegiate football players and non-athletes; an examination of how reforms in Bosnia-Herzegovina are influencing healthcare development; and a mathematical analysis of different voting systems.  The event is sponsored by the Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities Center (UCREA), which was established to promote undergraduate research and creative activity across the College of Arts & Sciences at Wake Forest and to foster collaboration among faculty and undergraduate students.

Contact: Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

 

PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE:  FOREIGN POLICY VS. ECONOMY — Jack Fleer, professor emeritus of political science, says that even though this week’s debate is intended to focus on foreign policy, the candidates are likely to fit economic issues into the forum as well. “They can do that by focusing on the impact the continued high expenditure in Iraq, the various trade agreements and globalization issues are having on the economy,” he says. On foreign policy issues, Fleer says Obama must deal with voters’ continuing concerns about his stature as potential commander-in-chief. “Right now they have less confidence in his ability than in McCain’s in that role. I think he can address that concern by pointing to the recent discussion among former secretaries of state, promoting diplomacy with Iran and the drawdown of forces with a fixed date in Iraq, both of which Obama has supported all along.”

Contact: Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

 

PROFESSOR, STUDENTS TO WATCH DEBATE TOGETHER— Allan Louden, associate professor of communication, is looking toward the upcoming presidential debates as pivotal in this election. The first one will be held Sept. 26 at the University of Mississippi.  Louden and students from his political communication class will watch the televised debate together at 9 p.m. in Carswell Hall’s Annenberg Forum.  “Debates are hugely important in this election,” Louden said.  “This time, they could be the whole game.”  He said they are more “high-risk” for Obama, partly because Obama declined earlier debates that could have diluted the importance of the ones sponsored by the Commission on Presidential Debates. “Experience does count for something and all it would take is a moment when Obama is caught flat-footed and McCain knows something.  That would erase the age issue. Then again a senior moment, like Reagan’s closing statement in his first debate, could sink McCain.”  Louden is an expert on presidential debates and political campaigns.  He regularly analyzes political ads and provides commentary on political debates for national media outlets.  He posts debate analysis on DebateScoop.org, a Web site devoted to encouraging lively analysis of political debates.  Wake Forest hosted presidential debates in 1988 and in 2000.  Wake Forest won the 2008 national debate championship.

Contact:  Cheryl Walker, walkercv@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

 

2008 ELECTION SOURCES AVAILABLE — Wake Forest faculty members are available to comment on the 2008 candidates, issues and campaign strategies. Experts are available from a wide range of areas, including political science, debate, religion, law and business, covering topics such as campaign ads, presidential debates, health care, banking, political scandal and young voters. Visit www.wfu.edu/wfunews/2008/election/ for a searchable list of experts and issues.

Contact: Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

FATHERS AND DAUGHTERS:  STRENGTHENING THE BONDS — Fathers and daughters often do not have the close ties mothers and daughters have, says Linda Nielsen, professor of education at Wake Forest.  In her new book, “Between Fathers & Daughters:  Enriching and Rebuilding your Adult Relationship” (Cumberland House Publishing, September 2008), Nielsen offers practical advice for strengthening the father-daughter bond.  As part of Wake Forest’s family weekend, Nielsen will lead a workshop for fathers and step-fathers of Wake Forest students from 4-5 p.m. Sept. 26.  It will focus on how the fathers can help their daughters deal with academic challenges and promote their social, physical and mental well-being.  “Sadly, too many of us continue to downplay the importance of the father-daughter relationship in comparison to the mother-daughter relationship,” Nielsen said.  “We still too often treat dads, especially divorced dads, like the mom’s ‘sidekick’ or her ‘apprentice’ in parenting.  The research is so overwhelming and so consistent in regard to the lifelong impact that a dad has on his daughter, and also the tremendous impact that daughters have on their fathers.”    Contact the News Service if you would like to arrange an interview with Nielsen or the fathers attending the event.

Contact:  Cheryl Walker, walkercv@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

“PULPIT FREEDOM SUNDAY” RAISES QUESTIONS — The Alliance Defense Fund has called for ministers across the nation to “reclaim” their pulpits on Sept. 28, and deliver sermons specifically about candidates for political office using Scripture. Bill Leonard, dean of the Wake Forest School of Divinity, says this “Pulpit Initiative” is an attempt to challenge the IRS tax-exemption requirements for churches. “Pastors should feel free to endorse candidates as they wish,” he says. “They should act on conscience in areas that they feel are essential to their proclamation of the Gospel. Then they should reject tax exempt status from the government.” Leonard says they can’t have it both ways. “My Baptist forbears would have understood this completely. Live out your conscience, but refuse to be privileged by the state.” In addition to the issue of tax exemption status, Melissa Rogers, visiting professor of religion and public policy, says “the ADF initiative is a bad idea because it promotes bad theology in the Christian tradition as I understand it. The church is not a ‘party boss’ and it should not act like one. Rather, the church is a body of believers that follows Jesus Christ and His teachings, teachings that transcend and stand in judgment of all party politics and candidates.”

Contact: Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

‘THE SCANDALOUS GOSPEL OF JESUS’ AUTHOR TO SPEAK — Peter Gomes, Plummer Professor of Christian Morals at the Harvard Divinity School and Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church of Harvard University, will deliver the sermon at 7 p.m. Oct. 5 during Worship in Wait at Wake Forest’s Wait Chapel. Gomes’ most recent book is “The Scandalous Gospel of Jesus: What's So Good About the Good News?” Two of his previous books, “The Good Life: Truths That Last in Times of Need” and “The Good Book: Reading the Bible with Mind and Heart,” were on The New York Times best-seller list. The goal of Worship in Wait is to respond to contemporary issues within the context of ecumenical worship.

Contact: Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

 

NYANYA PROJECT RAISES FUNDS FOR AFRICA AIDS RELIEF — The Nyanya Project, a nonprofit agency founded by Wake Forest faculty member Mary Martin Niepold to help African grandmothers raise their grandchildren orphaned by AIDS, will host a fund-raising event from 5 p.m. - 7 p.m. Oct. 10 at the University of North Carolina’s School of the Arts in the Main Theatre of the ACE Cinema Complex.  The event is open to the public, and donations will be accepted for admission.  The event will feature a film documentary produced by UNCSA School of Filmmaking students, who accompanied Niepold to Tanzania this summer; personal accounts of the trip by athletes and student who participated; African music; and items made by the grandmothers available for purchase.

Contact: Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.


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