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Stories this week at Wake Forest University


May 7, 2008

MEDIA DETAILS FOR E.J. DIONNE’S COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS — Members of the media are invited to cover Wake Forest University’s commencement ceremony at 9 a.m. May 19, featuring Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne as speaker. Wake Forest News Service-issued parking passes and media credentials will be required for media to enter campus the day of the event. To request parking passes for your news staff, contact the News Service as soon as possible.

Contact: Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5238.

JOB OUTLOOK STILL POSITIVE FOR MOST WFU GRADUATES — With the national economy slowing and financial markets jittery, a wide range of employers continue sending recruiters to meet Wake Forest graduates, reports William Currin, director of career services. “Our total number of on-campus interviews is up about 9 percent, and the total number of organizations interviewing on campus is up as well,” Currin says. Last year, 96 percent of Wake Forest graduates were employed or enrolled in graduate or professional school six months after graduation, and Currin expects that placement rate to hold up this year. In a survey of about 1,000 job postings, Currin finds that nine out of 10 employers are still open to considering liberal arts majors, and seniors are getting jobs in such diverse fields as education, public relations, business management, financial services, accounting and consulting.

Contact: Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

‘LIFE-CHANGING’ TRIP INFLUENCED SENIOR’S CAREER PLANS—Senior economics major James Beshara, from Dallas, Texas, was so moved by the poverty he witnessed during a summer study-abroad trip to Africa, he helped launch a nonprofit organization, The Dvelo Fund, to offer fellowships to other students who want to examine development issues firsthand in Africa.  Beshara accompanied Sylvain Boko, Zachary T. Smith Associate Professor of Economics at Wake Forest, to several African nations in 2007 and was even made an honorary member of the Rwandan Reconciliation Commission.  Upon his return, Beshara worked with Boko to establish the fund.  After graduation, Beshara plans to work for a microfinance bank in Cape Town, South Africa.

Contact: Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5238.

FRIEND TO THE HOMELESS HEADED TO NEW ORLEANS — While a student at Wake Forest, Jordan Jones, of Fayetteville, helped organize fellow students for a “camp-out” at a Winston-Salem homeless shelter to raise public awareness, and he co-founded “Saturday Ministry,” a program in which student volunteers provide a meal and join in conversation with about 150 homeless and poor people each weekend.  Jones also made mission trips to Calcutta, India, where his role model, Mother Teresa, served the needy; to Nicaragua; to Bolivia; and to New Orleans, helping restore properties damaged by Hurricane Katrina.  After graduation, the senior business major will return to New Orleans, putting his compassion and organizational skills to use with Good Work Network as a counselor helping low-income minority entrepreneurs start business ventures.

Contact: Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5238.

FOOTBALL STAR TURNING ‘PRO’ AT MEDICAL SCHOOL — For Demon Deacon football star Louis Frazier, an offensive lineman who played in the Orange Bowl and Meineke Car Care Bowl, going professional means entering the Wake Forest University School of Medicine this fall with a full Vice President’s Scholarship.  The senior from Clearwater, Fla., overcame tough childhood circumstances to discover a love for biology, earn a full athletic scholarship, and become a three-time All-ACC Academic Team member and 2007 First Team Academic All-American.  When he wasn’t scoring a 4.0 grade-point average in biology, he found time to serve as president of the Golden Key International Honor Society; vice president of Omicron Delta Kappa, a national leadership and honor society; first vice president of the Student Athlete Advisory Committee; and worship leader for Athletes in Action.

Contact: Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5238.

SENIOR DRAWS ON POLITICS FOR AWARD-WINNING COMIC STRIP—Senior political science major William C. Warren, who is a studio art minor, began contributing editorial cartoons to the student newspaper, the Old Gold & Black, during his freshman year.  In the fall of 2006, he started “Lummox,” a comic strip that chronicles the adventures of Lummox and Goodrich, two freshman roommates. 
The comic strip won Warren this year’s National Journalism Award for College Cartooning from the Scripps Howard Foundation, along with a $10,000 cash prize and recognition during a dinner at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.  Warren, who is from Atlanta, also won the John Locher Award from the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists in 2006. Part of his prize was a trip to the group’s annual conference in Denver, where he met established cartoonists, including his favorite, Pulitzer Prize-winner Michael Ramirez, who gave him advice and critiqued his work.  Warren’s editorial cartoons have appeared in various publications, including the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. After graduation, Warren plans to work at Americans for Limited Government, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank, and hopes to secure a syndication deal for his comic strip.

Contact: Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5238.

BIG APPLE BECKONS FOR COMMUNICATION MAJOR — Following graduation, senior Kristen Guth, from McLean, Va., will spend the summer in a media fellowship at NBC’s flagship affiliate WNBC 4 New York, located at Rockefeller Center in Manhattan.  While earning her degree in communication with a concentration in media studies, Guth served as creative director for The Student online magazine, wrote for the Old Gold & Black student newspaper, participated in the advertising club and performed with the concert choir.

Contact: Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5238.

ACCOUNTING GRAD WINS APPOINTMENT TO POLICY BOARD —Nicole Burnap, who received her Bachelor of Science degree in finance last year and will complete a Master of Science in Accountancy this year, was selected from applicants across the nation as one of 10 post-graduate technical assistants to serve a one-year appointment to the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) in Norwalk, Conn.  FASB is an independent agency that sets financial reporting standards recognized by the Securities and Exchange Commission and the American Society of Certified Public Accountants.  Burnap, who is from Mesa, Ariz., considered becoming a lawyer before coming to Wake Forest.  But she found her niche in the accounting program at the Calloway School of Business and Accountancy and enjoyed an internship with PricewaterhouseCoopers.  After her term at the FASB, she plans to pursue a doctoral degree studying capital markets and accounting.

Contact: Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5238.

POST-GRAD PROGRAM HELPS ENTREPRENEURS GROW BUSINESSES — In 2005, a single hand-sewn stuffed toy robot — a gift from a student to her friend —became the prototype for a start-up toy company, Stuffed Robot.  Senior studio art majors Jessie Vogel, from Metairie, La., and Bill Brown, from Nashville, Tenn., have been successfully selling their handmade creations online and in several Winston-Salem stores.  Now, they’ve been awarded post-graduation fellowships by Wake Forest’s Office of Entrepreneurship and Liberal Arts for its 2008-2009 Fifth Year Institute.  The program will allow them to explore ways to scale up production and expand their company.  The award includes free course enrollment, stipends each semester, a housing allowance, funding for market research and other development costs and access to resources that can help them build their business.  Fellow senior Ali Carroll, also from Nashville, and a double major in communication and studio art, is the third Fifth Year Institute Fellow for 2008-2009.  Carroll founded a jewelry business called Adia, which means “valuable gift” in Swahili.  She designs, imports and sells unique beaded jewelry made by Kenyan women, not only providing them with employment but also sharing her profits with African development organizations aimed at lifting residents out of poverty.

Contact: Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5238.


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