SearchDirectoriesHelpSite MapHome
Wake Forest University

News Releases

Stories this week at Wake Forest University


March 5, 2008

SPRING BREAK FOR SOME MEANS VOLUNTEERING – Each spring, many Wake Forest students opt to spend their spring break on a service-related trip.  For this year’s spring break, March 8 – 16, eight students will travel to Hilton Head Island, S.C., to assist the Humane Society, while 17 students will assist with the continuing clean-up and reconstruction efforts in New Orleans.  In addition, a group of 10 sociology students who took last summer’s course “Social Stratification in the American Deep South” designed a service trip through Wake Alternative Break to return to Stephens, Ark., where they plan to work in the local high school with teenagers interested in attending college.  In the past, students have volunteered in rural South Dakota, Oklahoma, Florida, and South Carolina, as well as in urban settings such as Washington D.C., New Orleans, Charleston and Boston.  Past trips involved tutoring with HeadStart, participating in an environmental clean-up, serving in homeless shelters and helping with hurricane relief efforts. 

Contact:  Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-4393

THE BIBLE AND HIV — Musa W. Dube, associate professor of theology and religious studies at the University of Botswana, will give a free lecture March 6 at 7 p.m. in Wait Chapel titled “Go tla Siama, O tla Fola: Doing Biblical Studies in an HIV& AIDS Context.” “Go tla Siama,” means it will be okay; while “o tla fola," means you will be healed. These two phrases have become popular expressions amid the intensity of the HIV and AIDS pandemic in Africa. Dube worked with the World Council of Churches, serving as a HIV/AIDS and theological consultant for churches and theological institutions of Africa. Her role was to train theological lecturers and church leaders to mainstream HIV/AIDS and gender issues in their programs. Dube has edited two books on HIV/AIDS curriculum,Methods of Integrating HIV/AIDS in Theological Programs” andAfrica Praying: A Handbook of HIV/AIDS Sensitive Sermons and Liturgy.”

Contact:  Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-4393

DIVINITY STUDENTS MAKE PILGRIMAGE TO NYC – The Rev. Douglas Bailey, associate professor and executive director of the Center for Urban Ministry at the Wake Forest Divinity School, will lead a group of 16 divinity school students on an urban ministry pilgrimage to New York City during spring break, March 8 - March 14.  Bailey calls this a pilgrimage because “one can go on a trip to observe; pilgrims go on a journey to be changed.”  Among their scheduled activities are ministering in Lower West Harlem, participating in the nation’s largest soup kitchen in Chelsea – Hell’s Kitchen, studying with renowned black pastor and theologian, Dr. Johnny Ray Youngblood, and visiting Ground Zero. 

Contact:  Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-4393

WAKE FOREST CONFERENCE ASKS ‘WHY WORK?’ – Columnist David Brooks and former congressman Lee Hamilton are among a group of distinguished authorities who will speak at a two-day conference titled, “Why Work? Business, Professions and the Common Good,” at Wake Forest University March 27-28.  The conference, part of the university’s 2007-2008 Voices of Our Time speaker series, will bring together experts from the fields of business, education, government, law, medicine and religion to discuss the key challenges faced in professional life today.  For the complete conference schedule, visit http://www.wfu.edu/voices/

Contact:  Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5238.

RELIGION IN IRELAND:  PROFESSOR TEACHES COURSE ON CELTIC CHRISTIANITY — As St. Patrick’s Day approaches, the legend will be retold of how the Christian missionary Patrick banished all the snakes from Ireland.  However, zoologists say there never were snakes in Ireland, and historians suggest that the snakes refer instead to the druids, who had their own non-Christian religion.  Over time, the Christian church incorporated elements of the druids’ traditions into its own religious practices in Ireland.  Linda McKinnish Bridges, professor of ministry studies in the Wake Forest Divinity School, teaches the students in her Celtic Christianity class about the unique blend of Christianity with indigenous religions such as druidism found in Ireland, Scotland and Wales.  Bridges says that in those countries, Christianity was assimilated peacefully rather than through violence.  “From the fifth through the 10th centuries the two faiths mixed easily, creating an egalitarian, monastic community that was open to pre-Christian myth, accepting of the notion that deity was revealed through sacred landscape,” she says.  Today remnants of the druidic tradition remain within the practice of Christianity in Ireland.

Contact:  Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-4393

WAKE FOREST'S BABCOCK SCHOOL STUDENTS, FACULTY HEAD BACK TO NICARAGUA FOR SPRING BREAK — A group of 16 students and at least two faculty members from Wake Forest University and the Babcock Graduate School of Management will share their skills with Nicaraguan business owners while learning about business outside the classroom during spring break.  The March 7-14 trip will be the fourth made by Babcock School students in a little more than a year as part of the school’s ongoing Project Nicaragua.  The students plan to host two, two-day business seminars for small- to medium-sized businesses in and around Managua and spend a day visiting several small–business owners.

Contact:  Lisa Snedeker at lisa.snedeker@mba.wfu.edu or (336) 758-3615

PEW RELIGION STUDY FINDINGS NOT SURPRISING – Bill Leonard, dean of the Divinity School at Wake Forest, is available to talk about the findings in the U.S. Religious Landscape Survey released recently by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life.  Leonard says that people who teach American religion have seen these trends over the past 20 years. He says one of the most interesting findings is the declining numbers of Protestants.  Leonard says the rise of non-affiliated individuals in America, “people who may consider themselves believers but not belongers, who have a personal religious orientation but choose not to participate in institutional religion,” may be the result of the growth of megachurches. “It may be at the expense of smaller churches in their regions; like the loss of mom and pop retail stores when Wal-Mart arrives in a community.”

Contact:  Audrey Fannin, fannin@wfu.edu or (336) 758-4393

NEW FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM HELPS STUDENTS GO TO DEVELOPING COUNTRIES — James Beshara, a senior economics major at Wake Forest University, with the help of Sylvain Boko, Zachary T. Smith Associate Professor of Economics at Wake Forest, has launched the Dvelo Fund, a fellowship program designed to give students an opportunity to study development issues in the underdeveloped countries. Fellowships up to $4,000 are available to undergraduate students who plan to travel to developing countries to conduct firsthand research or to participate personally in development programs.  Beshara got the idea for the program after what he calls “a life-changing” trip to Africa with Boko during the summer of 2007.  They were able to raise funds privately to launch the fund and have obtained nonprofit status to facilitate accepting tax-deductible contributions from other sources.

Contact:  Eric Frazier, frazieef@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5238.


Search News Archive



Wake Forest University • Winston-Salem, North Carolina • Information: 336.758.5000 | Feedback