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Lecturer to examine role of Islamic law in Middle East economy


November 7, 2007

Timur Kuran, professor of economics and political science and Gorter Family Chair in Islamic Studies at Duke University, will speak on “Economic Underdevelopment in the Middle East: The Historical Role of Islamic Law” at 4 p.m. Nov. 27 in Benson University Center’s Pugh Auditorium on the Wake Forest campus.

The event, sponsored by the economics department, is free and open to the public.

Since the mid-1990s Kuran has sought to understand why the Middle East, which once had a high standard of living by global standards, subsequently fell behind in economic production, organizational capability, technological creativity, democratization and military strength.  He believes the economic and educational institutions of Islam, though well-suited to the era in which they emerged, were poorly suited to a dynamic industrial economy.  His recent papers have identified obstacles involving inheritance practices, contract law, procedures of the courts, the absence of corporations, the financial system and the delivery of social services.

For more information on the lecture, call (336) 758-5334.

Press Contacts:

Eric Frazier
(336) 758-5237


Kevin Cox
(336) 758-5237


Timur Kuran, professor of economics and political science and Gorter Family Chair in Islamic Studies at Duke University, will speak on "Economic Underdevelopment in the Middle East: The Historical Role of Islamic Law" at 4 p.m. in Benson University Center's Pugh Auditorium on the Wake Forest campus.
Timur Kuran, professor of economics and political science and Gorter Family Chair in Islamic Studies at Duke University, will speak on "Economic Underdevelopment in the Middle East: The Historical Role of Islamic Law" at 4 p.m. in Benson University Center's Pugh Auditorium on the Wake Forest campus.
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