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Stories this week at Wake Forest University


March 28, 2007

ACCOUNTING STUDENTS CRUNCH NUMBERS FOR START-UPS Wake Forest University students are helping entrepreneurs at start-up companies make the connection between good ideas and sound financial practices through a class taught in the university’s Calloway School of Business and Accountancy.  The course, “Accounting and Financial Management for Entrepreneurs,” is an elective within the Calloway School’s Master of Science in Accountancy program.  Teams of graduate accounting students enrolled in the course began consulting in January with six companies to provide financial analysis and to develop spreadsheet tools to make financial projections.  Three of the companies are local biotechnology companies.  The remaining three include a software company in California’s Silicon Valley, a theater production company started by Wake Forest students and a nanotechnology company based in Greensboro.  “A goal of the course is to help students and the entrepreneurs they are helping identify what it takes to make a successful pitch for venture capital and what role an accountant plays in that pitch,” said Terry Baker, associate professor of accountancy, who teaches the course.

Contact:  Cheryl Walker, walkercv@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

THE CHEMISTRY BEHIND WINEMAKING – With the explosive growth of North Carolina’s wine industry during the past 10 years, there is little doubt winemaking has become an in important piece of the state’s economic puzzle.  In an effort to bolster the industry and educate students about winemaking, the Wake Forest chemistry department will host a seminar on the chemistry behind winemaking with winemaker Marek Wojciechowski, owner of Chatham Hill Winery in Morrisville, near Cary.  His free, public talk, “New Analytical Methods in Viticulture and Enology - A Winemaker’s Perspective,” is scheduled for 4 p.m. March 28 in Salem Hall, Room 10.  “Wake Forest is the only major university within the Yadkin Valley AVA, the only officially designated American Viticultural Area in North Carolina,” said Robert Swofford, a chemistry professor and organizer of the event.  “As such, there is a significant opportunity to become involved in this important economic force in the state.”  According to www.ncwine.org, the official Web site for the state wine and grape council, the number of wineries in North Carolina grew from 21 in 2000 to more than 50 in 2005.  Wojciechowski holds a doctorate in analytical chemistry from Warsaw University in Poland, and he taught chemistry at universities in Poland, Maryland and New York for more than 15 years.

Contact:  Jacob McConnico, mcconnjn@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

 

CRAINSHAW TO DISCUSS NEW BOOK ‘KEEP THE CALL’ – Jill Y. Crainshaw, associate dean for vocational formation and assistant professor of ministry studies in the Wake Forest Divinity School, will discuss her new book, “Keep the Call:  Leading the Congregation without Losing Your Soul,” at 4 p.m. March 28 in Wingate Hall, Room 202.  The book, released in 2007 by Abingdon Press, offers pastors suggestions for developing more integrated, holisitic and healthy ways of serving God and leading His people.  Crainshaw says many congregational leaders struggle to balance the biblical models of preaching and pastoral care with the secular models of administration and leadership.  It can leave many pastors feeling confused, ineffective and burned out, she said.  The free, public talk is part of the “New Horizons in Religious Studies” lecture series, which was created by the Divinity School and the religion department to highlight recent publications by faculty members.

Contact:  Jacob McConnico, mcconnjn@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

PERSPECTIVES ON THE ARAB-ISRAELI CONFLICT – Salim Tamari, director of the Institute for Jerusalem Studies, will give the lecture “The Arab-Israeli Conflict and the Demise of the Two-State Solution” at 6 p.m. March 28 in Pugh Auditorium in Wake Forest’s Benson University Center.  Tamari, who also serves as professor of sociology at the University of California at Berkeley and at Birzeit University in the West Bank, has been coordinator for the Refugee Working Group in the multilateral peace negotiations with Israel.  He is an expert on Palestinian politics and society, peace negotiations between Israel and Palestine and the status of Jerusalem.  Tamari’s appearance at Wake Forest is sponsored by the political science, history, religion and sociology departments and the Middle East and South Asian studies minor.  For more information about the lecture, call (336) 758-5449.

Contact:  Jacob McConnico, mcconnjn@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

CENTRAL ASIA FOCUS OF GREAT DECISIONS LECTURE – At 7 p.m. March 29, Thomas Brister, visiting assistant professor of political science, will lead a discussion on “Central Asia: Three Power Resource Rivalry.”  The free, public lecture will be held in Wake Forest’s Scales Fine Arts Center, Room A102.  Rich in energy supplies and strategically located, the five countries of Central Asia attract attention from the Middle East, China, Russia and the United States.  Brister will discuss U.S. interests in the region and how international competition for energy supplies affects each country.  This is the second lecture in Winston Salem’s Great Decisions 2007, a six-week citizens forum on current foreign policy issues.  The series is sponsored by Wake Forest’s Center for International Studies.  The Great Decisions Series is a national foreign policy education program sponsored by the Foreign Policy Association.  Founded in 1918, the FPA is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, nongovernmental educational organization that strives to educate Americans about the significant international issues that influence their lives.  For more information about the Great Decisions Series, contact Yomi Durotoye, the series coordinator, at (336) 758-1910 or visit www.wfu.edu/greatdecisions.

Contact:  Jacob McConnico, mcconnjn@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

RECONCILING THE EXISTING CHURCH, THE EMERGING CHURCH – Tim Conder, a founder of the Emergent Village, author of “The Church in Transition:  The Journey of Existing Churches into the Emerging Culture and founder of a church in Chapel Hill called Emmaus Way, will lead a discussion at 7 p.m. March 29 in Wingate Hall, Room 202.  His lecture, “Between Two Churches:  The Existing Church and Emerging Church in Collision, Collaboration & Generative Friendship,” will focus on the nature of the relationship between the emerging church and the existing church.  The event is free and open to the public.  Conder will sign copies of his book, which will be available for purchase at the event.  For more information about the lecture, call (336) 758-5121.

Contact:  Jacob McConnico, mcconnjn@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

TEACHING THE BUSINESS OF ART Wake Forest’s Office of Entrepreneurship and Liberal Arts, in conjunction with Reynolda House Museum of American Art and the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA), will host the second annual Supporting Entrepreneurship in the Arts (SEA) Conference from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. March 31 at Reynolda House.  The day-long event brings together student and emerging artists with successful working artists and skilled professionals to introduce and strengthen the entrepreneurial skills needed to make a living as an artist.  Ben Cameron, program director for the arts at the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, will be the keynote speaker.  More than 30 professionals from fields like the visual, performing and literary arts, arts-related business and arts management, will lead discussions to help aspiring writers, musicians, illustrators, dancers and actors learn to survive as professional artists.

Contact:  Cheryl Walker, walkercv@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

SUMMIT TO ENCOURAGE COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT To encourage community involvement and personal development, Wake Forest’s Multicultural Male Caucus will present the summit experience “Create Space:  Opening Doors and Facilitating Change” March 31.  The event, which is free and open to the public, will begin at 1:30 p.m. in Benson University Center’s Pugh Auditorium with a welcome and a presentation called “Barack Obama:  The Thrivals Phenomenon Personified” by Nat Irvin II, assistant dean of Wake Forest’s Babcock Graduate School of Management and founder/president of FutureFocus 2020.  Panel discussions on “Economic Integrity:  Where Your Treasure Is, There, Too, Is Your Heart” and “Discovering your Cultural Identity” will begin at 3 p.m. and will be repeated at 4 p.m.  “In a world where the absence of authentic community inspires isolation, discord and violence, institutions of higher learning have a responsibility to create space for helpful engagement around ‘the why’ of these and other social issues,” said Marcus Ingram, assistant chaplain for the university and one of the summit’s organizers.  Although sponsored by the Multicultural Male Caucus, the event is open to both women and men regardless of race.

Contact:  Cheryl Walker, walkercv@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

RESCHEDULED DEATH PENALTY LECTURE TO BE HELD APRIL 4 Sister Helen Prejean, author of “Dead Man Walking,” will speak at Wake Forest at 7 p.m. April 4 in Wait Chapel.  The event was rescheduled due to travel delays from inclement weather.  Prejean’s lecture will be followed by a question-and-answer session and booksigning.  The event is part of President Nathan O. Hatch’s new “Voices of Our Time” speaker series and is free and open to the public.  Media interested in covering the event must arrive by 6:45 p.m.  A limited number of audio connections are available.  Cameras may set up on the balcony stairs or on the right front row facing the podium.

Contact:  Pam Barrett, barretpm@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

CHARLIE ROSE TO MODERATE GLOBAL ECONOMY DISCUSSION – Wake Forest will host a panel discussion moderated by Emmy Award-winning journalist Charlie Rose at 4 p.m. April 10, featuring four top executives who represent a mix of global businesses:  satellite communications, computer technology, banking and branded apparel marketing.  The discussion, “Jumping the Sun:  Creating Competitive Advantage in an Increasingly Flat World,” will address what American business and higher education must do to remain competitive in today’s rapidly changing global marketplace.  The event will be introduced by Sen. Richard Burr and will include panelists:  Charlie Ergen, founder, chairman and chief executive officer of EchoStar Communications/DISH Network; John Medica, former senior vice president of the consumer product group at Dell Inc.; Ken Thompson, president and chief executive officer of Wachovia Corporation; and Eric Wiseman, president and chief operating officer of VF Corporation.  Media are invited to attend, but seating must be reserved.

Contact:  Pam Barrett, barretpm@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.


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