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Stories this week at Wake Forest University


February 28, 2007

KICKING THE CARBON HABIT William Sweet, author of “Kicking the Carbon Habit:  the Case for Renewable and Nuclear Energy,” will give the talk “How Much Can We Do about Climate Change?” at 4 p.m. Feb. 28 in Winston Hall, room A.  An expert on renewable energy, Sweet is a graduate of the University of Chicago and Princeton University.  He is senior news editor at IEEE Spectrum, the flagship publication of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers.  Sweet points to coal and its carbon emissions as the chief culprit behind environmental problems and suggests wind and nuclear power should be important parts of the solution.  His work has appeared in dozens of newspapers and magazines, including the Los Angeles Times, The New Republic and MIT's Technology Review.

Contact:  Cheryl Walker, walkercv@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

NATIONAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP WEEK OBSERVED AT WFU – The Office of Entrepreneurship and Liberal Arts at Wake Forest is celebrating “Entrepreneurship Week U.S.A.” with several events running through March 3.  At 6 p.m. Feb. 28, there will be an open house in the University Center for Entrepreneurship, Room B-02 of Kirby Hall.  The event is open to Wake Forest students, faculty and staff.  Information about the entrepreneurship and social enterprise minor and upcoming programs and resources for those interested in launching ventures will be available.  Guests will have an opportunity to speak with student entrepreneurs and meet faculty from the Office of Entrepreneurship and Liberal Arts.  Entrepreneurship week events conclude with “Regenerative Medicine – New Approaches for the 21st Century,” a presentation by Dr. Anthony Atala, director of the Institute for Regenerative Medicine at Wake Forest University School of Medicine.  During the presentation, which is scheduled for 4 p.m. March 2 in Winston Hall, Room 126, Atala will discuss how he has moved technology from the lab to the marketplace.  The event is free and open to the public.

Contact:  Wake Forest News Service at (336) 758-5237.

MEDIA INVITED TO ATTEND DISCUSSION WITH BETH TWITTY Beth Twitty, the mother of Natalee Holloway, will speak to Wake Forest University students about spring break safety at 7 p.m. Feb. 28 in Pugh Auditorium, located in the Benson University Center.  The event is free and open to the public.  Twitty will answer media questions during a press conference from 6 to 6:30 p.m. in Room 407 of Benson.  Members of the media are invited to cover Twitty’s talk in Pugh Auditorium, but are asked to record only the last two to three minutes of the event.  Television photographers may set up cameras along the back wall and are welcome to shoot footage of Twitty interacting with students following her speech.  Holloway disappeared in May 2005 while on a high school graduation trip to Aruba. Her disappearance generated a six-month national media sensation. Holloway remains officially missing although Aruban authorities believe she is dead.  Twitty is a special needs teacher who is committed to sharing her daughter’s story and educating high school and college students on personal safety.  In response to her daughter’s disappearance, Twitty established the International Safe Travels Foundation to educate and inform the public about safe international travel.  The lecture is sponsored by the Wake Forest Student Union. For more information, call (336) 758-5697.

Contact:  Wake Forest News Service at (336) 758-5237.

WFU HISTORIAN DISCOVERS, DONATES POLITICAL CARTOONS While researching political cartoons for her 2003 book, “Rough Rider in the White House:  Theodore Roosevelt and the Politics of Desire,” history professor Sarah Watts came across one by German Expressionist artist Lyonel Feininger.  That finding eventually led to a gift by Watts to Harvard University of a substantial collection of Roosevelt cartoons that should prove valuable to researchers in years to come.  Before he gained fame as a painter and paragon of the German Expressionist movement of the 1920s, Feininger worked as a caricaturist and political cartoonist whose work was published in prominent German satiric journals of the pre-World War I period.  Four weeks of researching journals in Berlin last year yielded 12 more Roosevelt cartoons by Feininger, along with 91 more by other artists.  “The cartoons are significant in a number of respects,” Watts said.  “For one thing, they were the first in Germany to portray an American president as a personality.  Previously, the U.S. and its diplomats were usually represented by the Uncle Sam character.  For another, German political satirists generally portrayed Roosevelt as a sober statesman, an international player.  Most of the ‘cowboy’ stuff we see in American cartoons about Roosevelt was for domestic consumption.”  With funding from Wake Forest’s history department, the roughly 100 Roosevelt cartoons Watts assembled were filmed, printed, digitized, translated into English and placed in large notebooks organized according to magazine and year.  Watts then donated the notebooks to the Theodore Roosevelt Collection in Harvard’s Houghton Library, where the former president’s books and papers are kept. Virtually all of the cartoons are in color.

Contact:  Cheryl Walker, walkercv@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

CHINESE CELEBRATION HIGHLIGHTS DANCE, MUSIC, KUNG FU THEATER Wake Forest will host a free Chinese Cultural Celebration, featuring “Tales from the Beijing Opera” from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. March 4 in Brendle Recital Hall.  The Bejiing Opera performers are known for elaborately painting their faces in colors that symbolize the personalities and roles of the characters.  The celebration will also include several performances by local and professional groups, including martial arts, musical and dance performances and the popular lion dance.  A Chinese fashion show will be held featuring traditional and contemporary Chinese costumes.  Following the performance, the Opera performers will hold a question-and-answer session.

Contact:  Pam Barrett, barretpm@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

POETRY AND MUSIC KICK OFF IRISH FESTIVAL – The 10th annual Irish Festival hosted by Wake Forest University Press will start with “An Evening of Poetry, Music and Fun” at 7:30 p.m. March 6 in the Charlotte & Philip Hanes Art Gallery in Scales Fine Arts Center.  The reading will feature Irish poet Justin Quinn and musical performances by the traditional Celtic band Green Folk and singers Mary and Glenn Siebert.  The reading will also celebrate the official North American launch of Irish poet Michael Longley’s latest book, “Collected Poems.”  A reception featuring authentic Irish food and drink and a booksigning with Quinn will be held following the reading.  Other events offered as part of this year’s Irish Festival include the popular Community Day to be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 17 on Davis Field at Wake Forest and an Irish Pub Quiz at 7:30 p.m. March 20 at Finnigan’s Wake Pub in downtown Winston-Salem.

Contact:  Pam Barrett, barretpm@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

‘WOMEN AND WORDS’ FOCUS OF FIFTH-ANNUAL TRIBLE LECTURES – The Phyllis Trible Lecture Series at Wake Forest University, scheduled for March 6-7 in Brendle Recital Hall in the university’s Scales Fine Arts Center, celebrates its fifth year with a program dedicated to the exploration of “Women and Words.”  The theme focuses on the power of religious language as it is used by women and about women to restrict or transform.  In addition to three leading feminist scholars of religion who will focus on biblical language, the language of worship and theological language from a global perspective, this year’s series also features acclaimed writer Mary Gordon.  The author of several novels, short stories and personal essays, Gordon is the Millicent C. McIntosh Professor of Writing at Barnard College and Columbia University.  Other speakers for this year’s lecture series include Susan Niditch, the Samuel Green Professor of Religion at Amherst College; Kwok Pui Lan, the William F. Cole Professor of Christian Theology and Spirituality at the Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Mass.; and Gail Ramshaw, professor of religion at LaSalle University and past president of the North American Academy of Liturgy.  For a full schedule and lecture titles, visit the lecture Web site at http://divinity.wfu.edu/trible-lectures.html.  For additional information, call (336) 758-3310.

Contact:  Jacob McConnico, mcconnjn@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.

WAKE FOREST IN FOOD FIGHT WITH OTHER BIG FOUR SCHOOLS – From Feb. 1 to March 3, Wake Forest will participate with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Duke University and North Carolina State University in the annual “Big 4 Food Fight,” a friendly competition between the schools to help feed the hungry.  Each school will be collecting food and money to support the America’s Second Harvest Food Banks in their area.  Wake Forest Student Government will be collecting Food & Funds for the Second Harvest Food Bank at the home game March 3.  Donations can also be made online at http://www.hungernwnc.org/big-four.html.  For the purposes of this campaign, every $1 donated will equal 5 pounds of food.  The university that collects the most donations (per capita) will be deemed the winner at the March 3 game when the Deacons face Virginia.  The winner of the drawing will be announced at the game.

Contact:  Jacob McConnico, mcconnjn@wfu.edu or (336) 758-5237.


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